Gallery

Upcoming Show:

Feathered Friends

August 31 - November 20

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Upcoming Show

The Ashby-Hodge Gallery of American Art on the Fayette campus of Central Methodist University presents "Feathered Friends: Six Decades of Watercolor Painting of Birds by David Plank" along with a Memorial to Brother Mel Meyer, S.M. (1928-2014) Sculpture, Watercolors, Acrylics.  The show runs from August 31 – November 20, with an artist reception for Plank on Sunday, Aug. 31.

There is no charge and all are welcome to the Gallery during its open hours, Sunday and Tuesday-Thursday from 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Feathered Friends

David Plank has spent all of six decades plus parts of two others painting birds. In 1973, after three years in the Army and 11 more as a pressman, he became a full-time painter of birds. He has no regrets and shows no signs of slowing.

While Plank's birds are anatomically correct, he softens poses and colors in order to communicate his personal vision of the birds and their surroundings, rather than trying to duplicate nature as an objective illustrator might.

"Many artists," Plank explains, "try to catch the essence of the bird. On the other hand, I try to catch the essence of what I feel about the bird."

He places his birds in backgrounds that complement them and reflect the correct habitat; however, he chooses the colors and arrangements to match what he has felt about that bird.

Kingbirds

Most of the birds Plank paints are those that can be found around the rich Ozark hills hugging his home in Salem, Mo. Some birds are migrants who pass through for a brief visit. The only bird, he thinks, in the Ashby-Hodge exposition alien to Plank's native home is the cactus wren, painted when he was in Arizona.

Plank's favorite birds to paint—when forced to choose—are the songbirds. He feels them the most and can interpret them more easily than raptors, for instance, whose demeanor seems to change less.

Plank is known for his numerous paintings for magazines and books, including cover designs. He has also shown his bird paintings around the country.

He has 12 paintings and 30 drawings in Arkansas Birds – Their Distribution and Abundance (by Drs. Douglas James and Joseph Neal, University of Arkansas Press, 1986); and was the sole artist for The Birds of Missouri – Their Distribution and Abundance (by Dr. David Easterla and Mark Robbins, University of Missouri Press, 1992). Full news release on Plank.

 

For additional information on the Gallery, contact Dr. Joe Geist, registrar of the collection at jegeist@centralmethodist.edu or Denise Gebhardt at dgebhard@centralmethodist.edu, or by calling the Gallery at 660-248-6304.

 
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