“Synergy” Unveiled at Central Methodist University

Sculpture first outdoor art for Ashby-Hodge Gallery

Homecoming at Central Methodist University recently was more than the normal parade, lunch and football game. It also marked the unveiling of the first sculpture outside of The Ashby-Hodge Gallery of American Art in Classic Hall.

The bronze piece named "Synergy" was given by the Ashby-Hodge Gallery Board in gratitude for the longevity and depth of support of the Gallery by founders the Tom Ashbyhodgeyanceysynergy1 family the Anna Mae Hodge family; and by former curators Thomas Yancey and Dr. Joe Geist.

The sculpture is the work of Columbia artist Larry Young, whose work is internationally acclaimed. He has placed more than 50 monumental outdoor sculptures during his 25-year career, usually created in bronze, steel, or marble.

He learned his craft as a molder in the U.S. Navy, after which he pursued art at Columbia College, followed by a two-year fellowship to study sculpture in Italy. He is especially known for his innovative use of negative space.

Young likes to focus on the origin of mankind, man's relationship with other life, and his destination. His sculptures tend to be very fluid, changing depending on the view the observer chooses.

In his notes about "Synergy," Young invited people to "move slowly around it, watching as the dynamic forms open and close to create visual energy. Creating movement in an inanimate, three-dimensional object is one of my primary objectives."

"Symbolically," he writes, "the rising serpentine volumes portray two mutually supporting strands or organisms that rise up to achieve a visual effect not possible alone. . . For me it is an excellent fit with the nature of a great liberal arts education—the pieces come together to create a result that is not possible alone."

In his opening remarks, Dr. Roger Drake, president of CMU, pointed out that the location of the sculpture at the south edge of the campus reflects the joining of town and university in a symbiotic relationship, leading the two entities to be more together than either can be apart.

Homecoming at Central

installingsynergy2

Methodist University recently was more than the normal parade, lunch and football game. It also marked the unveiling of the first sculpture outside of The Ashby-Hodge Gallery of American Art in Classic Hall.

The bronze piece named "Synergy" was given by the Ashby-Hodge Gallery Board in gratitude for the longevity and depth of support of the Gallery by founders the Tom Ashby family the Anna Mae Hodge family; and by former curators Thomas Yancey and Dr. Joe Geist.

The sculpture is the work of Columbia artist Larry Young, whose work is internationally acclaimed. He has placed more than 50 monumental outdoor sculptures during his 25-year career, usually created in bronze, steel, or marble.

He learned his craft as a molder in the U.S. Navy, after which he pursued art at Columbia College, followed by a two-year fellowship to study sculpture in Italy. He is especially known for his innovative use of negative space.

Young likes to focus on the origin of mankind, man's relationship with other life, and his destination. His sculptures tend to be very fluid, changing depending on the view the observer chooses.

In his notes about "Synergy," Young invited people to "move slowly around it, watching as the dynamic forms open and close to create visual energy. Creating movement in an inanimate, three-dimensional object is one of my primary objectives."

"Symbolically," he writes, "the rising serpentine volumes portray two mutually supporting strands or organisms that rise up to achieve a visual effect not possible alone. . . For me it is an excellent fit with the nature of a great liberal arts education—the pieces come together to create a result that is not possible alone."

In his opening remarks, Dr. Roger Drake, president of CMU, pointed out that the location of the sculpture at the south edge of the campus reflects the joining of town and university in a symbiotic relationship, leading the two entities to be more together than either can be apart.


Pictures: top- Anna Mae Hodge and Tom Yancey unveil the artwork at Homecoming. bottom-Artist Larry Young (in red jacket) and Dr. Joe Geist (with umbrella) as the CMU plant operations crew assist in placing the sculpture in a spate of rain and sleet.

 

Posted November 5, 2013

 
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