Economics Classes

EC122 Economics for Educators. 3hours. A course designed to familiarize students seeking certification to teach at the elementary and middle school levels with the basic economic concepts that elementary and middle school students are expected to know and to explore the teaching tools and techniques that are available for teaching economics at those levels. (Restricted to students seeking certification to teach at the elementary level and at the middle school level with a concentration in social science. Those seeking certification to teach at the high school level should take either [preferably] EC201 Macroeconomics or EC202 Microeconomics.)

EC190 Special Topics. 1-3 hours. Introductory course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission.

EC201 Macroeconomics. 3 hours. Following an initial introduction to important general economic concepts, including demand and supply, the course examines the U.S. economy from a macroeconomic perspective. It includes an analysis of (1) how unemployment, inflation, and Gross Domestic Product are measured, (2) different theories of why the economy goes through cyclical fluctuations (recessions and booms) in the short-run, (3) long-run economic growth, and (4) the use of monetary and fiscal policies to stabilize the economy. Prerequisite: MA103 (or ACT Math subscore ≥ 20).

EC202 Microeconomics. 3 hours. Following an initial introduction to important general economic concepts, including demand and supply, the course examines the U.S. economy from a microeconomic perspective. It includes an analysis of (1) the theory of consumer behavior, (2) elasticity, (3) costs and supply, (4) market structure, (5) anti-trust law and regulation, and (6) factor markets. Prerequisite: MA103 (or ACT Math subscore ≥ 20.)

EC260 Special Problems. 1-3 hours. Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission.

EC268 Internship and Field Experiences. 1-5 hours.

EC290 Special Topics. 1-3 hours. Intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission.

EC302 Economics of Public Policy. 3 hours. This course focuses on "public choice" theory. After a review of the case for relying on the market to allocate resources, the course looks at situations in which markets fail to yield optimal results and the case for using government to correct for these market "failures" (such as public goods and externalities). The course then uses economic analysis to examine how government operates and to investigate the possibility of government "failure"—the idea that government actions may themselves be a source of non-optimal results. Prerequisite: EC201 or EC202 or instructor's permission.

EC311 Money, Credit, and Banking. 3 hours. Examination of the role of money, financial markets, and financial intermediation in the American economy, with a particular focus on commercial banks. Includes an in-depth look at the money supply process and the Federal Reserve System. Prerequisites: EC201 and EC202.

EC314 Managerial Economics. 3 hours. Intermediate microeconomics with a focus on applications of Economics to decisions made by managers of a firm, including the concepts of demand analysis and forecasting, production and cost analysis, and pricing and output decisions. Prerequisite: EC202; or instructor's permission.

EC316 Intermediate Macroeconomics. 3 hours. This course builds on the material covered in EC201. After reviewing basic macroeconomic concepts, it looks at different models of how the aggregate economy functions in both the short-run and the long-run (including Keynesian, monetarist, supply-side, and real business cycle models). It also looks at the use of monetary and fiscal policies to stabilize the economy. Prerequisites: EC201 and EC202.

EC330 Law and Economics. 3 hours. Use of the tools of micro-economic analysis to investigate the legal system of the United States. A variety of specific topics are covered, including property rights, contracts, family law, tortlaw, criminal law, anti-trust law, and regulation. Prerequisite: EC202; or instructor's permission.

EC347 International Economics. 3 hours. Examination of the economic interdependence among the nations of the world. The first half of the semester covers the theory of international trade and explores such issues as why nations trade with one another, the results of such trade, and the consequences of interfering with free trade with tariffs and quotas. The second half covers international finance and focuses on the determination of exchange rates, the balance of payments, and the international transmission of business cycles. Prerequisites: EC201 and EC202.

EC360 Special Problems. 1-3 hours. Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission.

EC368 Internship and Field Experiences. 1-5 hours.

EC390 Special Topics. 1-3 hours. Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission.

 
©