ADP Course Descriptions

AC201 Principles of Accounting I. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is an introduction to integrated financial and managerial accounting systems with emphasis on a) providing economic information to all users, b) accounting terminology, and c) using financial statement analysis and accounting information for decision making. Practical applications of math, communication, and skills used in business will be integrated. Prerequisite: MA 103.

ACC301 Principles of Financial Accounting. 4 hours/7 weeks. This course is an examination of the development and use of accounting information for the purposes of planning, control and decision making. Topics will include accounting cycles, asset valuation, liabilities, forms of owner's equity, income determination, managerial accounting applications, capital budgeting and interpretation of published financial statements.

ACC302 Managerial Accounting. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will focus on managerial accounting, cost accounting, management performance reports, segment reporting, variable costs, cost, profit, and volume analysis. Prerequisites: MG 409 and ACC 301

ADM495 Seminar in Business. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is an integrative capstone course stressing the application of all prior learning concerning business problems through case analysis and simulations/gaming. Application to the major functions of business within the context of social, technological, economic, political and physical environments. Policy formation and executive action will be the focus as the conceptual approach for establishing guiding principles for courses of action.

AH316 Data Analysis for Nursing Practice. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course focuses on statistical data and terminology as it applies to nursing research. Students will learn the importance of statistics in performing data analysis and will be introduced to basic statistical procedures. Prerequisite: MA103.

AH330 Business Concepts in Health Care/Case Management. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will focus on the economics of health care, legal aspects of health care, health care systems in the U.S., budgeting concepts, Medicare guidelines, and entrepreneurship.

BI110 Biotechnology. 3 hours/5 weeks. This introductory course is primarily aimed at non-majors. This is a study of biotechnology, including the science behind it, how it is regulated, the impact on society and ethical concerns raised by new advances in biological sciences.

BU110 Introduction to Business. 3 hours/5 weeks. This is a survey course to acquaint students with the major institutions and practices in the business world; to provide the elementary concepts of business; to act as an orientation course for selecting a major; and to provide information on business career opportunities.

BU225 Computer Applications in Business. 3 hours/5 weeks. The course includes the use of microcomputer spreadsheet application software. Topics include creating, formatting, and manipulating files, graphs, and databases; using relational and logical operators to extract data; linking databases and creating reports. Emphasis is on business applications (i.e. Microsoft Office).

BUS227 Conflict Resolution for Managers. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will help students develop skills in the principles and practices that transform conflict in the workplace setting from destructive win-lose approaches to positive problem-solving processes that produce win-win outcomes. Special attention will be given to consensus decision-making and problem-solving. Students will revisit the learning team structure and processes in application of conflict resolution skills.

CMU202 Moral Leadership. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will explore moral and ethical development from philosophical, theological and historical perspectives and examine the unique moral and ethical challenges faced by leaders in today's contemporary business environment. The focus will be on the inner dimension of leadership and describing ethical perspectives and problem-solving strategies applied to making moral choices using case studies.

CT101 Public Speaking. 3 hours/5 weeks. Students study the theory of speech communication to develop skills in public-speaking situations. Topics include the speech-communication process, ethics, listening, intercultural considerations, speech-topic selection, audience analysis, research, use of evidence in a speech, speech organization, language usage, speech delivery, presentation aids, and the types of public speaking. Students present introductory, impromptu, commemorative, informative, and persuasive speeches as well as group presentations to improve their public-speaking skills Required of all students. 4/12

EC201 Macroeconomics. 3 credits/5 weeks. Following an initial introduction to important general economic concepts, including demand and supply, the course will examine the U.S. economy from a macroeconomic perspective. It includes an analysis of a) how unemployment, inflation, and Gross Domestic Product are measured, b) different theories of why the economy goes through cyclical fluctuations (i.e., recessions and booms) in the short-run, c) long-run economic growth, and d) the use of monetary and fiscal policies to stabilize the economy. Prerequisite: MA 103.

EC202 Microeconomics. 3 hours/5 weeks. Following an initial introduction to important general economic concepts, including demand and supply, the course will examine the U.S. economy from a microeconomic perspective. It will include an analysis of a) the theory of consumer behavior, b) elasticity, c) costs and supply, d) market structure, e) anti-trust law and regulation, and f) factor markets. Prerequisite: MA 103.

ED103 Child Development. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a study of the physical, motor, intellectual, social and emotional development of the young child as well as the development of an intelligent philosophy of adult-child relationships.

EN110 College Composition I. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will focus on techniques of topic development, drafting and revision to help students write clear, concise sentences, paragraphs and essays. EN 110 will also focus on the study of grammar, syntax, and diction and their relationship to effective writing.

EN111 College Composition II. 3 hours/5 weeks. EN111 will continue the mastery of techniques of topic development, drafting and revision but focus more on developing organizational patterns (e.g., narration, process, comparison, definition, and cause and effect). The students will practice these patterns through writing several essays, including a research essay. EN 111 will also focus on the study of grammar, syntax, and diction and their relationship to effective writing. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in EN 110.

EN222 Introduction to Literature. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course examines ways of understanding the meaning of character in human life through the study of literature.  All sections will introduce students to fiction, poetry, and drama, but each section will be designed around each instructor's chosen theme-based readings or around a general introduction to literature. Prerequisites: EN110 and EN111.

EN305 Expository Writing. 3 hours/5 weeks. This advanced course in composition is designed to relate to the specific needs and interests of upper-level students with an emphasis on argumentation and research skills. Prerequisites: EN110 and EN111.

ET375 Small Business Management. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will focus on the characteristics of the entrepreneur, methods of starting and running a self-owned business, and an awareness of the legal, financial, marketing, and personnel problems of the entrepreneur.

FB101 Personal Finance. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a survey course for both Business and non-Business students in personal financial planning, including personal budgeting, investments, insurance, credit, housing and retirement planning. Fundamentals of financial planning and making educated decisions regarding spending, saving, borrowing and investing that lead to long-term financial security will be the key components of this course.

HI117 Development of the United States I. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a survey from settlement to the end of Reconstruction (1877). Topics will include basic institutions (i.e., family, religion, education, politics and economics), the causes of the American Revolution, democratization, the U.S. Constitution, development of political parties, the causes of the Civil War and the changing status of African-Americans.

HRM400 Employee Recruitment and Retention. 3 credits/5 weeks – This course focuses on developing staffing needs, evaluating sourcing, recruiting internally and externally, hiring, and orientation of new employees. In addition, succession planning, retention and long-term staffing strategies are considered to meet the organization's goals and objectives. Prerequisite: MG 356

HRM 410 Employee Performance and Appraisal Management. 3 credits/5 weeks. This course will address issues related to monitoring the performance, development and training of employees. The focus will be on managing the talents, skills, abilities and knowledge of the human resources of a company to maximize performance. Prerequisite: MG 356

HRM 420 Essentials of Compensation and Benefits. 3 credits/5weeks. This course evaluates areas of compensation, such as base pay, incentive pay, performance pay, and benefits, and the balance of creating attractive compensation packages with the overall organizational needs and goals.   Consideration will be given to the current business climate and corporate priorities and the impact that has on creating a compensation plan that is ethical and fair. Legal issues are also evaluated. Prerequisite: MG 356

HRM 430 Employment Law, Labor Relations and Risk Management. 3 credits/5 weeks. This course will focus on federal and state laws and regulations regarding areas such as employee relations, discipline, discharge, and grievance/dispute resolution. Court decisions and case studies will be used. The relationship between management and labor and the right of labor to organize will be addressed. Prerequisite: MG 356 and MG 411

HRM 440 Occupational Safety, Health and Security. 3 credits/5 weeks. This course introduces students to the area of safety management, focusing on topics such as workers' compensation cases, dealing with OSHA requirements, ergonomics and violence in the workplace. The many ethical and moral dilemmas in safety management will be discussed. Prerequisite: MG 356

HRM 460 Special Problems in Human Resources. 3 credits/5 weeks. This course will allow students to study an area of the human resources field that is of special interest to them and utilize the information they have learned throughout their coursework to research that topic and develop strategies. A major research paper and presentation on the topic is the primary project in this course. Case studies and current topics in human resources will also be studied. Prerequisite: MG 356

IB376 International Business. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is an introduction and overview of international business as it has evolved to the present time. Topics will include the evolution of international business structure, processes utilized by international and multi-national businesses, and the effect of national policy on international business. Particular attention will be devoted to evaluating how culture, language, political and legal issues impact management policy and decision making. The course also explores the role of mid-size firms in the international market. Prerequisites: MG 421 and MG 409

MA103 College Algebra. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a study of equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations and inequalities.

MA105 Elementary Statistics. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is an introduction to basic statistical procedures with application to all areas. Prerequisite: MA103.

MG356 Human Resource Management. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will focus on HRM concepts related to the selection of employees, employee training, leadership styles, job design, communication systems, and rewards and punishments. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

MG365 Organizational Theory. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will focus on the knowledge and skills to study organizations as a whole entity and to recognize needed changes to improve effectiveness and performance. This course is an examination of complex, formal organizations as systems linked into an environment. This course will also focus on organization goals, structure, internal processes, job design and degree of centralization and formality. Prerequisite: MG356.

MG409 Economics: Theory, Concepts, and Issues (Micro/Macro). 3 hours/6 weeks. This course is a survey of microeconomic issues such as price, competition, monopoly, oligopoly, income distribution, international trade, and economic development. This course will also include a survey of macroeconomic issues, such as the structure of modern economics, its production, interrelationships, the nature and function of money, monetary and fiscal policy, and public finance.

MG411 Business Law and Governmental Regulations. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will examine, analyze and apply the nature, formation and system of law in the United States to the modern business environment.

MG421 Strategies in Marketing Management. 3 hours/5 weeks. As a manager in an ever-changing, fast-paced, technology-driven society, the magnitude of understanding our product or service while meeting the needs of our customers is vital to our existence not only in a traditional sense, but in the virtual aspect as well. This course offers a managerial approach to marketing with a focus on matching organizational goals with customers' needs in an ethical and socially responsible manner, while addressing basic marketing concepts, processes, problems and applications.

MGT302 Management and Leadership. 3 hours/5 weeks. This is an introductory course for adult students pursuing an undergraduate degree. Topics will include group interaction, communication skills, professional and personal growth, academic resource utilization, organizational dynamics, and other topics relevant to goal accomplishment in an academic setting. This course requires finalization of a degree completion plan prior to enrollment in any other coursework. Cross-listed with PY302.

MGT425 Issues in Ethics. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will focus on individual, organizational, and societal issues in business ethics. Dilemmas, real-life situations, and case studies will provide an opportunity for the students to use concepts and resolve ethical issues. Since there is no universal agreement on the correct ethical business norms, on critical thinking, and on informed decision-making, Issues in Ethics will provide an introduction to ethical decision-making in business.

MK330 Marketing. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will focus on the concepts and techniques involved in marketing products and services to consumers and industrial users. Topics will include the role of marketing, the selection of marketing targets, product planning, channels of distribution, product promotion and pricing. Prerequisite: BU110.

NU300 Adaptation Nursing. 2 hours/4 weeks. This course introduces the student to the adaptation framework. The four modes of adaptation are explored with the focus on the individual student who explores his or her own adaptation level. The framework is applied to health restoration, maintenance, and enhancement of nursing interventions with a focus on wellness. Students also will be introduced to the online portfolio system in this course. Students will have the opportunity to explore the portfolio system and begin building their portfolio.

NU301 Physical Assessment. 2 hours/4 weeks. This course will introduce the students to physical assessment using the adaptation nursing model. The four modes of adaptation are explored with the focus on psychosocial needs identified through interview skills and physiologic needs identified through physical assessment skills.

NU303 Research in Nursing. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is an introduction to research in the discipline of Nursing. Topics will include elements of the research process, examination of research design, development of research proposals, and application of the research process in the clinical area. Prerequisite: AH316.

NU315 APA Format and Research Databases. 1 hour/2 weeks. This course focuses on writing research papers in the RN-to-BSN program. Areas highlighted include Smiley Library services (online and on campus) and utilizing APA format when writing.

NU320 Adaptation Nursing in the Community. 4 hours/7 weeks. This course will focus on the inter-relationship of community health principles and adaptation nursing. Lecture and seminar topics include community assessment, family assessment and dynamics, the role and function of the community health nurse, crisis intervention, epidemiology, legal/ethical issues of practice, economics of community/home health agencies, and patient education. Application of theory content will be through nursing practice in a county community health/home health agency. Prerequisite: NU301.

NU325 Historical Trends in Nursing. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will focus on the historical development of nursing from biblical time to the present day. Lectures and seminars focus on historical occurrences and trends in nursing and the current relationship between nursing and the health care system.

NU450 Integrated Concepts of Adaptation Nursing. 6 hours/10 weeks. This course will build on the concepts of NU300, NU301, NU302, and NU303, and will allow students the opportunity to apply these concepts through an individualized nursing practice under the supervision of a faculty advisor and a clinical advisor. Students will be required to develop a specific set of learning objectives for the selected area of clinical practice. This flexible approach to learning allows students the opportunity to develop expertise in a selected area of practice. The students must pass the practical, written, and oral components of this course to graduate. Prerequisites: AH316, AH330, NU315, NU300, NU301, NU303, NU320, NU325, and NU455.

NU455 Professional Issues, Leadership, and Management. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will prepare the students for the expanded role as nurse leader/manager. Lectures and seminars focus on management theories, leadership style, change theory, interpersonal and interprofessional relationships, and current issues and trends in practice and education.

PE140 Concepts of Wellness. 2 hours/4 weeks. This course will be a consideration of contemporary health concepts as they apply to an awareness of personal wellness.

PY101 General Psychology. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a survey of the many factors that influence behavior and the techniques that psychologists use to study these factors. Major topics will include heredity and physiology; development; learning and thinking; motivation and emotion; personality; and psychological adjustment, disorders, and treatment.

PY200 Introduction to Psychological Theories. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will introduce the students to a wide range of psychological approaches, including biological, social, and cognitive psychologies. It will examine areas such as identity, learning, memory, and language.

PY204 Experimental Psychology. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is an introduction to the basic process of conducting psychological research. Special attention will be focused on experimental methodology, the analysis and interpretation of data, and scientific report-writing.

PY210 Educational Psychology. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is an introduction of general psychological theories to the prospective elementary and secondary teacher. There will be a brief introduction to developmental stages, learning theories, individual differences and motivation with application to the classroom in teaching methods, content presentation and evaluation procedures.

PY211 Psychology of Personal Adjustment. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a study of individual differences and self-analysis of cognitive processes and emotional responses to normal and/or traumatic life events. Limitations and options for appropriate behavior will be explored through discussion, testing, and evaluations.

PY223 Developmental Psychology. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is an examination of the various aspects of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development from conception through late adulthood. Emphasis will be placed on child and adolescent development. Prerequisite: PY 101 or PY 210

PY301 Abnormal Psychology. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a study of the causes and treatments of behavior disorders. Special attention will be given to relevant diagnostic and legal issues. Prerequisite: PY 101

PY302 Personal and Professional Development. 3 hours/5 weeks. This is an introductory course for adult students pursuing an undergraduate degree. Topics will include group interaction, communication skills, professional and personal growth, academic resource utilization, organizational dynamics, and other topics relevant to goal accomplishment in an academic setting. This course requires finalization of a degree completion plan prior to enrollment in any other course work. Cross-listed with MGT302.

PY308 Personality. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is an examination of the major theoretical paradigms and research studies pertaining to the human personality. Psychodynamic, existential, humanistic, trait, social learning, and narrative approaches to understanding personality dynamics will be reviewed. Prerequisite: PY101.

PY321 Family Relationships and Values. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a study of interpersonal relations in courtship and marriage across cultures, with an emphasis on the currently changing values in the United States. It will focus on cultural, social, cognitive, and emotional bases of intimacy, commitment, and family roles.

PY324 Social Psychology. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a study of how people think about, influence, and relate to one another. The focus will be on the individual within group situations, including both the effects of the group on the individual and the effects of the individual on the group. Specific topics include conformity, persuasion, aggression, altruism, and attraction. Prerequisites: PY101 or SO101.

PY331 Research Design and Data Analysis in Social Sciences. 3 hours/6 weeks. This course is an introduction to research design, social measurement, analytic strategies, and applied statistical techniques relevant to the interpretation of social phenomena.

PY332 Cognitive Processes and Applications. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a study of cognitive processes such as perception, thinking, learning, and problem-solving. Special attention will be given to various applications of cognitive theory and research. Prerequisite: PY101.

PY334 Applied Quantitative Data Analysis in the Social Sciences. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a study of the application of quantitative analytic techniques to data in the social sciences. Prerequisite: MA105.

PY338 Applied Psychology. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is an examination of the applications of the facts, principles, and techniques of Psychology to a broad range of human endeavors. The core of the course consists of an introduction to the various career paths in Psychology. Prerequisite: PY101.

PY346 Sensation and Perception. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course will examine the process by which we interpret and organize sensory information to produce our conscious experience of objects and relationships among objects. Prerequisite: PY101.

PY351 Introduction to Counseling. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a study of basic theories and methods of counseling and psychotherapy including behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic approaches to counseling, client analysis, and interviewing techniques. This course will emphasize goals, responsibilities, and ethical problems in the counseling relationship. Prerequisite: PY101.

PY353 Industrial/Organizational Psychology. 3 hours/5 weeks. An introduction to the ways that psychological theory and research can be applied to understand and increase the effectiveness of people in the workplace. Course topics include personnel selection, training, performance appraisal, work motivation, morale, and job satisfaction. Prerequisite: PY101.

PY480 Senior Thesis (Capstone) (MFT Taken). 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a senior-thesis seminar and is open only to juniors and seniors majoring in Psychology. To receive credit in this course, all students must complete a directed research paper and must defend it successfully.

RL122 Religion and the Human Adventure. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is an introduction to the ways in which religion provides meaning and purpose for human life. The course includes a study of a variety of religious traditions, beliefs, and practices.

SC102 Concepts of Chemistry and Physics. 4 hours/7 weeks. This course is a study of basic physics and chemistry. The physics portion of the course includes motion, energy, heat and temperature (thermodynamics), sound, electricity, and light. The chemistry portion includes atoms, molecules, chemical bonds and chemical reactions. The final topic of the course, nuclear reactions, relates to both physics and chemistry.

SO101 Introduction to Sociology. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a study of social interaction and its products: culture, personality, social groups, institutions and social change.

SO102   Social Problems. 3 hours/5 weeks. This course is a study of the major problems of social and personal disorganization.

UNIV111 Introduction to Lifelong Learning. 3 hours/5 weeks. Adult learners in this course will gain an understanding of the policies and procedures, adult learning model, team building, study skills and human relations. The culminating activity is the selection of learning teams and construction of the team constitution.

 
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